Supplemental Job Displacement Benefits

Supplemental Job Displacement Benefits
March 28, 2019 No Comments Featured admin

What You Need To Know About Job Displacement Benefits in California Workers’ Compensation

Supplemental job displacement benefits (SJDB) are an important way for California employees to get back on their feet in workers’ compensation cases.

In California employee suffers a work-related injury, the state workers’ compensation system provides for several types of benefits. One of those types of benefits is called “supplemental job displacement benefits” (SJDB).

Supplemental job displacement benefits are non-transferable vouchers for employees who want to go to school or undergo vocational training so they can return to the workforce. They are an important tool for workers that are permanently disabled by a workplace injury, but still capable of doing some type of work. These are essential for injured employees to get back on there feet and be allow them to be competitive in the current job market.

In the following articles we will take a closer look into supplemental job displacement benefits, what they do, who is eligible for them, and how to get them.

Background on California’s Workers’ Compensation System

 

To fully understand supplemental job displacement benefits, workers should first understand how this type of benefit fits into California’s workers’ compensation system as a whole.

Purpose of Workers’ Compensation Laws

The foundation of the state’s workers’ compensation system lies in the California Constitution, which sets forth the intent of the people to establish a system of workers’ compensation:

“The Legislature is hereby expressly vested with plenary power, unlimited by any provision of this Constitution, to create, and enforce a complete system of workers’ compensation . . . .”

California Constitution, Article XIV, Section 4

This broad mandate provides the California Legislature with the power to create and enforce a complete system of workers’ compensation which strives to achieve substantial justice in all cases.

The legislature, in turn, has adopted a somewhat complex set of rules for employers and insurance companies, as well as a series of benefits for injured workers. This scheme has several defining characteristics, including:

  • Mandatory Insurance.Employers are required by law to maintain workers’ compensation insurance, which ensures that all employees can recover for their claims.
  • Work-Related Injuries Only.Only workplace injuries that arise in the normal course of business are compensable.
  • Exclusivity of Remedies.The workers’ compensation system is usually the exclusive way employees can legally recover for their workplace injuries.
  • No-Fault Compensation.Except in cases of serious or willful misconduct, eligible employees are entitled to benefits regardless of who was at fault for their injury.

Although many of these characteristics favor employees, there are several aspects of California’s workers’ compensation scheme that disfavor employees.

There are, for example, limits on the kinds of lawsuits an employee can file against their employer for workplace injuries, which may also limit their available damages.Employees may also be required to follow certain rules and comply with short deadlines when pursuing a workers’ compensation claim.

In essence, workers in California have given up their right to file a lawsuit against employers for their injuries. In exchange, they’ve been given a system that provides for a guaranteed, prompt, and limited recovery under the workers’ compensation scheme.

Benefits in Workers’ Compensation Cases

Under California’s workers’ compensation system, there are five broad categories of benefits provided to injured workers:

·   Medical treatment benefits,

·   Temporary disability benefits,

·   Permanent disability benefits,

·   Death benefits, and

·   Supplemental job displacement benefits.

Each type of benefit has a specific purpose in fulfilling the Legislature’s goal of fully compensating injured employees. The focus of this article is on the last category: supplemental job displacement benefits (sometimes called “displacement benefits” or “SJDB” for short). This type of benefit was once called “vocational rehabilitation retraining” because it can help people learn new skills.

Supplemental job displacement benefits are intended for workers in a very specific situation—those who are permanently disabled by a workplace injury, but only partially. Employees in other situations are probably not entitled to supplemental job displacement benefits, and for good reason.

Workers who are temporarily disabled, for example, are not eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits because they are expected to return to their regular jobs once they have recovered.

Likewise, employees who are permanently and totally disabled are ineligible for supplemental job displacement benefits, because they will not return to work. Put simply, the state does not require employers to provide work-related training to employees who will never be able to work again.

However, when workers suffer a permanently-disabling injury at the workplace, but they can still do some work, they are expected to eventually return to work. Thus, they are often eligible for a supplemental job displacement voucher to help them go to school or obtain other assistance finding a new job.

The Form Displacement Benefits Take

Employees eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits can receive a nontransferable voucher that allows them to enroll in an education-related training or skills enhancement program.

 

The voucher can be used to pay for the costs of school, job placement services, tools, computers, certification, and training to gain the skills necessary to enter a new line of work.

 Benefits in Workers’ Compensation Cases

Under California’s workers’ compensation system, there are five broad categories of benefits provided to injured workers:

·   Medical treatment benefits,

·   Temporary disability benefits,

·   Permanent disability benefits,

·   Death benefits, and

·   Supplemental job displacement benefits.

Each type of benefit has a specific purpose in fulfilling the Legislature’s goal of fully compensating injured employees. The focus of this article is on the last category: supplemental job displacement benefits (sometimes called “displacement benefits” or “SJDB” for short). This type of benefit was once called “vocational rehabilitation retraining” because it can help people learn new skills.

Supplemental job displacement benefits are intended for workers in a very specific situation—those who are permanently disabled by a workplace injury, but only partially. Employees in other situations are probably not entitled to supplemental job displacement benefits, and for good reason.

Workers who are temporarily disabled, for example, are not eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits because they are expected to return to their regular jobs once they have recovered.

Likewise, employees who are permanently and totally disabled are ineligible for supplemental job displacement benefits, because they will not return to work. Put simply, the state does not require employers to provide work-related training to employees who will never be able to work again.

However, when workers suffer a permanently-disabling injury at the workplace, but they can still do some work, they are expected to eventually return to work. Thus, they are often eligible for a supplemental job displacement voucher to help them go to school or obtain other assistance finding a new job.

The Form Displacement Benefits Take

Employees eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits can receive a nontransferable voucher that allows them to enroll in an education-related training or skills enhancement program.

The voucher can be used to pay for the costs of school, job placement services, tools, computers, certification, and training to gain the skills necessary to enter a new line of work.

Benefits in Workers’ Compensation Cases

Under California’s workers’ compensation system, there are five broad categories of benefits provided to injured workers:

  • Medical treatment benefits,
  • Temporary disability benefits,
  • Permanent disability benefits,
  • Death benefits, and
  • Supplemental job displacement benefits.
  •  

Each type of benefit has a specific purpose in fulfilling the Legislature’s goal of fully compensating injured employees. The focus of this article is on the last category: supplemental job displacement benefits (sometimes called “displacement benefits” or “SJDB” for short). This type of benefit was once called “vocational rehabilitation retraining” because it can help people learn new skills.

Supplemental job displacement benefits are intended for workers in a very specific situation—those who are permanently disabled by a workplace injury, but only partially. Employees in other situations are probably not entitled to supplemental job displacement benefits, and for good reason.

Workers who are temporarily disabled, for example, are not eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits because they are expected to return to their regular jobs once they have recovered.

Likewise, employees who are permanently and totally disabled are ineligible for supplemental job displacement benefits, because they will not return to work. Put simply, the state does not require employers to provide work-related training to employees who will never be able to work again.

However, when workers suffer a permanently-disabling injury at the workplace, but they can still do some work, they are expected to eventually return to work. Thus, they are often eligible for a supplemental job displacement voucher to help them go to school or obtain other assistance finding a new job.

The Form Displacement Benefits Take

Employees eligible for supplemental job displacement benefits can receive a nontransferable voucher that allows them to enroll in an education-related training or skills enhancement program.

The voucher can be used to pay for the costs of school, job placement services, tools, computers, certification, and training to gain the skills necessary to enter a new line of work.